Hispanics Key to Defeating MLG

In this week's Intelligencer, Hispanics continues drift away from Democrats, MLG struggling in polls, Otero County election drama continues, and the feds settles with New Mexico over environmental damage.

The Intelligencer is a weekly newsletter that gives you a quick overview of La Politica across New Mexico and the U.S., covering topics such as policy, current events, the political landscape, and tech.

Send us any feedback (including chismes and quejas) by going to our website or shoot me an email at dax[AT]nmhispanos.com. And if you are not already subscribed, sign up here.


Dax Contreras
Executive Director, Hispanos Unidos

1.  "The district that [Democrats] just lost in… the second most Latino district in the country — [Democrats are] banking on winning seven other districts that match that district word for word.”Chuck Rocha, Nuestro PAC

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Details: With last week’s Republican Mayra Flores flipping a longtime Democrat House seat in South Texas, some in the DNC see it as another indicator that Democrats must invest much more to get Hispanic voters.

What a drag: Analysis from FiveThirtyEight found that while support for President Biden has fallen disproportionately among those Latino voters compared to other groups, his overall approval rating remains higher among Hispanics than it does with white voters.

The big picture: Aside from inflation bringing down Biden/Democrat support, the culture war being waged by the Left against all who dissent is a long-term objective that could also be wearing on the average Hispanic in America.

2. Hispanic outreach the key to defeating the tyrant MLG?

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New numbers: A new poll by New Mexico Political Report, which paid the left-wing company, Public Policy Polling to conduct, says MLG is beating Ronchetti 45 - 42% by three percent, which is barely within the margin of error. Karen Bedonie, who decided to run as a Libertarian after (or maybe even before) she lost the Republican primary, garnered 9 percent, with 5 percent undecided.

Not surprisingly, MLG’s base is die-hard Biden loyalists at 86 percent. Ironically, as we’ve already highlighted in our first story, Lujan Grisham’s other base are Hispanic voters: 64 percent said they would vote for Gov. Grish, while only 28 percent support Ronchetti.

More numbers: Ronchetti, meanwhile, leads among Trump voters 88 percent to 8 percent for Bedonie and 1 percent for Lujan Grisham and among Native American, Black, Asian, and misc. voters only 45 percent back Lujan Grisham.  

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s job approval performance is at 48 percent — tied with her disapproval. She was higher among women than men: 54 percent of women approving of her job performance with 54 percent of men disapproving.

Down ticket: In the AG race, 44% support Democrat Raúl Torrez, who defeated his ambitious opponent, State Auditor Brian Colon, versus 37 percent support for Republican Jeremy Gay. Nearly a quarter said they were undecided at 19 percent.

Meanwhile, Secretary of State Democrat Maggie Toulouse Oliver has 41% against 34 percent for the controversial Republican, Audrey Trujillo, and 9 percent for Libertarian Mayna Myers. Another 16 percent said they were not sure. These numbers show Maggie as vulnerable, but with a Libertarian splitting the anti-Democrat vote and the toxic nature of Trujillo, it looks like the democratic process in New Mexico will be under the grip of the incumbent for another four years.

3. “If we get removed from office, nobody is going to be here fighting for the ranchers, and that’s where our fight should be right now.” — Otero County County Commissioner Vickie Marquardt

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State Power: The Otero County commission reversed an earlier decision to not certify the results of the June 7 primary election, as the state muscled the county to vote the way the Secretary of State wanted, as local residents booed and hissed their Commissioners who changed their position.

Local representation: Commissioner Couy Griffin called-in to the meeting as he was in Washington, D.C. to be sentenced for entering restricted U.S. Capitol grounds during the January 6th capitol riot, said his vote against certifying the primary was “not based on any facts…it’s only based on my gut feeling and my own intuition."

Outgunned: Marquardt’s sentiment echoes many in New Mexico: those who opposed the State Supreme Court’s rubber-stamping of the inconsistent and questionable COVID lockdown, those who oppose the one-party domination of the state government on all levels, and the frustrated watchdogs with better questions than the answers given to them by politician and bureaucrats in control of the status quo.

4. Federal government admits two separate fails in New Mexico

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Burned by the Feds: The U.S. Forest Service released an 80-page report admitting the bureaucrats who planned the proscribed burn in northern New Mexico underestimated the dry conditions, flammable foliage, and water supplies resiliency of rural villages — with multiple miscalculations, inaccurate models.

The federal manmade disaster has burned more than 533 square miles in northern New Mexico, where hundreds of homes have been destroyed, leaving many with nothing but remains of destroyed homes and charred land.

It is not clear from the report that the Forest Service will punish the individual bureaucrats responsible, but does state that several times before and after a test fire was lit, some personnel said they felt felt there could be higher risks but “accepted the assignment” anyway.

Environmental Disaster: Meanwhile, the Feds have settled for $32 million for the massive mine spill caused by the Environmental Protection Agency that released 3 million gallons of wastewater from the inactive Gold King Mine in southwestern Colorado, dowsing rivers with arsenic, lead, and other heavy metals down to New Mexico and through the Navajo Nation and Utah through the San Juan and Animas rivers back in 2015.

New Mexico also received $11 million from the mining companies involved as the case against EPA contractors involved is expected to be heard in the future.

 

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